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Mozambique: IPC Acute Food Analysis - Acute Food Insecurity Situation in Maputo and Matola June - September 2020, Published in July 2020

Country: Mozambique Source: Integrated Food Security Phase Classification MEASURES TO CONTAIN THE PANDEMIC REDUCE THE ECONOMIC ACTIVITY OF FAMILIES DEPENDENT ON THE INFORMAL SECTOR, NEGATIVELY AFFECTING THEIR FOOD SECURITY. The results of this Acute Food Insecurity pilot study indicate that for the current period (June - September 2020), about 55% of the population in the cities of Maputo and Matola is food secure (IPC Phase 1), 30% in Stress (IPC Phase 2) and 15% in Crisis (IPC Phase 3), i.e. about 365,000 people need humanitarian assistance to reduce food consumption deficiencies. The current restriction measures against COVID-19 since March/ April 2020 will affect the main economic activities in the cities of Maputo and Matola in different ways, but especially casual labour. Other factors negatively affecting household food security are reduced remittances and restrictions on informal imports of goods from South Africa, as well as commodity prices that are above the historical average. OVERVIEW OF THE CURRENT SITUATION (JUNE - SEPTEMBER 2020) Factors contributing to the current food insecurity situation: Continuation of current restrictive measures against COVID-19 since March/April 2020. These measures will affect the main economic activities in the cities of Maputo and Matola, as described below.
Casual labour is one of the main sources of income for approximately 20% of households and will be reduced due to the limitations imposed on the movement of people on public
Informal trade is one of the main sources of income for about 15% of households that will be drastically affected, mainly those who do not have stalls or shops and use the sidewalks and market floor to sell, which will be banned from selling their products.
Even those who have stalls in markets will likely be affected, as they will have difficulties in buying products for resale, as there is no informal trade with South Africa, aggravated by the significant decline in internal trade, between micro and small informal t
Domestic employment is one of the main sources of income for approximately 10% of households. Those who can live in the workplace will continue to work and a share of the rest will lose their job. Therefore, for domestic workers who are not formally accredited workers, it is believed that few will continue to receive wages when they are dis
Formal employment is one of the main sources of income for about 45% of the households that will also be affected, although with less severity. It is believed that some of these will lose their jobs and even if they receive compensation, they will have difficulties in the months following dismissal, because they have limited savings and there are increased prices. Some of those with formal employment may have their wages r
Producing and selling food crops is also one of the main sources of income for approximately 10% of households, which will be partially affected, since agricultural production activity will be able to continue, but through direct sale to the customer in the field. Even if income is affected, it is expected that these households will be able to consume their agricultural products, alleviating their food insecurity despite poor food diversifi
Civil construction is one of the main sources of income for about 8% of households that will be significantly affected, especially those who do not have formal contracts, given that there will be practically no work to hire these informal workers. However, as this group receives a reasonable income, it is believed that they will have some savings that can resort to in the following period. Price of the main foods consumed by the poorest has remained stable or decreased slightly since April. However, in the case of rice and corn, in May it was about 40% above the historical average. Remittances from South Africa decreased as more than 23,000 people left South Africa at the end of March A decrease in the movement of people and an increase in essential expenses, resulting from the effective COVID-19 contagion and the uncertainty of the future of the pandemic. Agricultural production according to the Maputo DPA grew by 0.2% compared to the previous year.


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