Wednesday 5 August 2020
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Uganda mVAM Bulletin: June 2020 Urban Food Security Monitoring

Country: Uganda Source: World Food Programme Key points WFP Uganda expanded its food security monitoring to cover urban areas to monitor the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on some of the most impacted populations. Starting from May 2020, data was collected continuously from 13 urban centres, including for Kampala-based refugees. The proportion of urban nationals with poor or borderline food consumption increased from 11 percent in May 2020 to 16 percent in June 2020 as indicated in Figure 1. Household food consumption has deteriorated steadily since monitoring started in May, despite a relaxation of pandemic containment measures. About 24 percent of refugee households in Kampala had poor or borderline food consumption in June which was slightly lower than the proportion reported in May 2020 at 27 percent. Household food consumption for refugees in Kampala improved in the second half of June, albeit initially from a lower level compared to urban nationals. Situation Update In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the government of Uganda imposed restrictions to economic activity and physical movement from the 18th of March 2020. To monitor the impact on some of the most impacted populations, WFP Uganda scaled up its remote monitoring system to cover 13 urban centres across the country. The proportion of urban nationals with poor or borderline food consumption increased from 11 percent in May 2020 to 16 percent in June 2020. Household food consumption for this population deteriorated steadily since monitoring started in May, despite a relaxation of pandemic containment measures. In June 2020, 16 percent of urban nationals and 24 percent of refugees in Kampala had insufficient food consumption.


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